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Charlie Crist on Energy & Oil

Republican

 


I'm not a scientists, but I can use my brain & talk to one

Charlie Crist knows how to work a storyline. The Democratic gubernatorial candidate, who as a Republican governor in 2007 said global warming was "one of the most important issues that we will face this is century," was handed an opportunity to highlight a difference between himself and Gov. Rick Scott when Scott said, "I'm not a scientist," in response to a question about climate change. Friday, Crist met with one of the scientists who has offered to meet with Scott and discuss the issue.

"I'm not a scientist either but I can use my brain and I can talk to one," said Crist, arriving for a 25-minute presentation by Professor Jeff Chanton of the Florida State University Earth and Atmospheric Science Department. A consequence of global warming is rising sea levels. Billions of dollars of Florida real estate and roads are at risk as the sea moves inland. [Prof. Chanton estimates 17 inches sea level rise].

Source: SaintPetersBlog weblog on 2014 Florida gubernatorial race , Jul 26, 2014

Reduce climate change by doing things we should do anyway

It was virtually important, I was convinced, to do what we could to reduce climate change as much as possible. Cleaning our rivers. Cutting carbon dioxide. Finding new ways to protect the wetlands. Those were all beneficial on their own terms, whether or not someone accepted the science of climate change or cared to heed its warnings. It seemed to me we should be doing all those things anyway.

I didn't only read about climate change and discuss it with my friends. I led by example. In April I ordered an energy audit at the Governor's Mansion and outfitted the place with high-efficiency lightbulbs and a Heliocol solar heater for the outdoor swimming pool. I also got a new car: an ethanol-fueled Chevy Tahoe. There was only one ethanol station in Tallahassee, but the effort was worth it, I thought.

Source: The Party's Over, by Charlie Crist, p.104 , Feb 4, 2014

BP oil spill made me oppose offshore oil drilling

The 2010 BP oil spill was looking more severe by the day. I flew over the Gulf in a huge Florida National Guard C-144 aircraft so I could get a wide-angle view of what was already an 80-by-42-mile dark blob on the Gulf. The spill had already made me rethink my openness to offshore oil drilling for Florida, I said. How could it not?

As soon as I returned to the Capitol, I called the Florida National Guard. "Do whatever you can to keep that oil spill from coming up on the beaches of the Panhandle."

Source: The Party's Over, by Charlie Crist, p.237-238 , Feb 4, 2014

Instituted state cap-and-trade by Executive Order

The governor had issued a series of executive orders instituting global warming cap-and-trade regulations, which would become law unless the legislature overrode them. We had the difficult task of coming up with a bill the governor would sign that would override his executive orders. We found a solution. We passed a bill that instructed Florida's Department of Environmental Protection to create an outline of cap-and-trade plan for the state. However, the plan couldn't take effect unless the legislature approved it. The governor signed it because he could claim he got a signature initiative passed by the legislature. The legislature passed it because we knew we could stop it later, no matter what the governor did.

When we ran against each other a couple of years later, in an effort to convince Republican voters he was the more conservative candidate, Crist falsely claimed I had supported cap and trade. But I didn't support cap and trade.

Source: An American Son, by Marco Rubio, p.157-158 , Jun 19, 2012

Open to cap-and-trade plan for carbon emissions

Crist's reputation as a moderate flows in part from his willingness to break from his party on offshore drilling (which he opposed, until 2008) and his openness to notions like a "cap and trade" plan for the carbon emissions that contribute to global warming.
Source: New York Times on 2010 Florida Senate debate , Jan 10, 2010

$200M package for solar, wind, & biofuel from citrus

What Florida has done for biotech, it can also do for clean tech. Thatís why Iím recommending a $200 million economic development package for solar, wind and other renewable energy, and to promote biofuels in Florida and encourage alternative fuels such as ethanol. We have the opportunity to enhance the use of this cleaner fuel, while also providing a broader market for sugar cane and citrus waste. [We have] explored non-food sources of ethanol production in Farm to Fuel efforts.
Source: 2008 State of the State Address to Florida legislature , Mar 4, 2008

Propose almost $70 million on alternative energy development

I have proposed almost 70 million dollars in my budget to foster the development and use of alternative energy sources and fuels in our state, including ethanol and biodiesel fuels for our cars and solar power for our homes. With these measured steps, we can begin to achieve three important goals: addressing global climate change, promoting Florida agriculture, and weaning our country from reliance on foreign oil.
Source: 2007 State of the State Address , Mar 6, 2007

Supports renewable energy tax credits.

Crist supports the CC survey question on renewable energy tax credits

The Christian Coalition voter guide [is] one of the most powerful tools Christians have ever had to impact our society during elections. This simple tool has helped educate tens of millions of citizens across this nation as to where candidates for public office stand on key faith and family issues.

The CC survey summarizes candidate stances on the following topic: "Tax credits for investment in renewable sources of energy, (such as wind, solar & biomass)"

Source: Christian Coalition Survey 10-CC-q18 on Aug 11, 2010

Voted YES to assist rural electric renewable energy.

Crist voted YEA Clean Economy Jobs and Innovation Act

Congressional Summary:This bill requires the Department of Energy to award grants to assist rural electric cooperatives with identifying, evaluating, and designing energy storage and microgrid projects that rely on renewable energy. (A microgrid is a group of interconnected energy resources that acts as a single controllable entity and that can disconnect from the grid to operate in island mode.)

SciPol statement in support: HR4447 would establish a microgrid grant and technical assistance program for rural electric cooperatives. Rural electric cooperatives are non-profit consumer-owned electric cooperatives that came into being in the 1930s to serve the needs of rural areas otherwise ignored by investor-owned (for-profit) utilities. Most rural electric power is still provided by rural electric co-ops.

Trump's Statement of Administration Policy (against): HR 4447 would implement a top-down approach that undermines the Administration's deregulatory agenda. HR 4447 would lead to higher energy costs and discourage innovation. It would create a "green bank" that would subsidize projects similar to wellknown failures like Solyndra. Finally, HR 4447 would interfere with our own energy destiny free from the reins of the Paris Climate Accord and international organizations that ignore the clear lessons that have led to American energy independence.

Common Dreams (against): Over 100 groups--including major environmental, climate and progressive organizations--oppose HR 4447. The heaviest burdens of the climate crisis fall on low-income communities and communities of color. "We applaud the environmental justice measures in this bill, but cannot support legislation that extends our country's reliance upon fossil fuels," said the Executive Director of the Progressive Democrats of America.

Legislative outcome: Passed House 220-185-24, Roll #206 on Sep. 24, 2020.

Source: Congressional vote 20-HR4447 on Sep 20, 2019

2021-22 Governor, House and Senate candidates on Energy & Oil: Charlie Crist on other issues:
FL Gubernatorial:
Adam Putnam
Alexander Snitker
Andrew Gillum
Annette Taddeo
Bill Nelson
Brian Moore
Gwen Graham
Nikki Fried
Philip Levine
Rick Scott
Ron DeSantis
Wayne Messam
FL Senatorial:
Bill Nelson
Carlos Lopez-Cantera
David Jolly
Edward Janowski
Marco Rubio
Pam Keith
Patrick Murphy
Rick Scott
Ron DeSantis
Open Seats / Turnovers 2022:
AL-5: Mo Brooks (R) running for AL Senator
CA-37: Karen Bass (D) running for mayor of Los Angeles
FL-10: Val Demings (D) running for FL Senator
FL-13: Charlie Crist (D) running for FL governor
HI-2: Kai Kahele (D) running for MD governor
MD-4: Anthony G. Brown (D) running for attorney general of Maryland
MO-4: Vicky Hartzler (R) running for MO Senator
MO-7: Billy Long (R) running for MO Senator
NY-1: Lee Zeldin (R) running for NY governor
NY-3: Thomas Suozzi (D) running for NY governor
NC-8: Ted Budd (R) running for NC Senator
NC-11: Madison Cawthorn (R) Incumbent lost renomination
OH-13: Tim Ryan (D) running for OH Senator
OK-2: Markwayne Mullin (R) running for OK Senator
OR-5: Kurt Schrader (D) Incumbent lost renomination
PA-17: Conor Lamb (D) running for PA Senator
SC-7: Tom Rice (R) Incumbent lost renomination
TX-1: Louie Gohmert (R) running for attorney general of Texas
VT-0: Peter Welch (D) running for VT Senator

Special Elections 2021:
LA-2: Troy Carter (R, April 2021)
LA-5: Julia Letlow (R, March 2021)
NM-1: Melanie Stansbury (D, June 2021)
OH-11: Shontel Brown (D, Nov. 2021)
OH-15: Mike Carey (R, Nov. 2021)
TX-6: Jake Ellzey (R, July 2021)
Hot Races 2022:
CA-27: Christy Smith (D) vs. Mike Garcia (R)
FL 27: Annette Taddeo (D) vs. Maria Elvira Salazar (R)
GA-7: Carolyn Bourdeaux (D) lost redistricting race to Lucy McBath (D)
GA-10: Vernon Jones(R) vs. Paul Broun (R,lost May 24 primary) to replace Jody Hice (R) running for Secretary of GA
ME-2: Bruce Poliquin (R) rematch against Jared Golden (D)
MI-10: John James (R) - running for newly redistricted seat
MI-11: Andy Levin (D) redistricted to face Haley Stevens (D)
MT 1: Ryan Zinke (R) - running for newly created seat
MT-2: Al Olszewski(R) vs. Sam Rankin(Libertarian) vs. Matt Rosendale(R)
NJ-7: Thomas Kean Jr. (R) challenging Tom Malinowski (R)
NY-10: Bill de Blasio (D) challenging Mondaire Jones (D)
NY-11: Max Rose (D) challenging Nicole Malliotakis (R)
NY 12: Carolyn Maloney (D) redistricted to face Jerry Nadler (D)
RI-2: Seth Magaziner (D) vs. Allan Fung (R)
RI-1: Allen Waters (R) vs. David Cicilline (D)
TX-34: Mayra Flores (R) - Elected SPEL June 2022; general election Nov. 2022 against Vicente Gonzalez (D)
WA-4: Brad Klippert (R) challenging Dan Newhouse (R)
WV-2: David McKinley lost a redistricting race to fellow incumbent Alex Mooney

Special Elections 2022:
AK-0: Sarah Palin (R) vs. Al Gross (Independent)
CA-22: Connie Conway (R) replaced Devin Nunes on June 7.
FL-20: Sheila Cherfilus-McCormick (D) replaced Alcee Hastings on Jan. 11.
MN-1: vacancy left by Jim Hagedorn (R), deceased Feb. 17; SPEL on August 9.
NE-1: Jeffrey Fortenberry (R) Resigned on March 31, after being convicted; Mike Flood (R) in SPEL on June 28.
NY-19: Marc Molinaro (R) running for SPEL Aug. 23 for seat vacated by Antonio Delgado (D), now Lt.Gov.
TX-34: Mayra Flores (R) SPEL June 14 for seat vacated by Filemon Vela Jr. (D)
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Page last updated: Jun 17, 2022; copyright 1999-2022 Jesse Gordon and OnTheIssues.org